What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Physical Therapy Advice For Heel Pain

Girl with plantar fasciitis heel pain

That first step – the burning, stinging pain in your heel stops you in your tracks. It’s been getting worse over the course of the last few months and you hoped it would go away by now. All you want is to be able to live your life the way you used to – to walk and to run pain-free. Plantar Fasciitis can be debilitating and long-lasting, but with the proper treatment, you can improve.

Let’s look more closely at Plantar Fasciitis: what it is, who it affects, and what the best treatment options are…

Cracking Joints: What’s That Sound?

Cracking Joints Sound

I’ve never been able to crack my knuckles. Growing up, cracking your knuckles was a sign that you were a cool kid – similar to double-jointedness or being able to wiggle your ears. Then, once about the third grade hit, teachers started telling us cracking your knuckles was bad – that it would eventually lead to arthritis and an inability to have normal-functioning hands. That same belief carried over to when our knees started popping when we squatted down. If knuckle-cracking was bad, the knee-popping must be bad, too, right?

Which joints crack for you? Your knuckles? Knees? Shoulders? Hips? Ankles? Neck?

What is it that actually causes the cracking sound inside your joints? Is it bad? Should you be concerned? Let’s explore…

How To Get The Most Out Of Your Time In Physical Therapy

A Patient’s Guide Written By A Physical Therapist

physical therapy goals
This is a guest post by Randal Glaser, PT, DPT, OCS, CEAS I. He is the Co-founder of Jetset Rehab Education, a continuing education company for Rehab Professionals. You can check out Jetset’s blog and podcast (which will both feature yours truly soon!). Follow Jetset on twitter and instagram for exciting con-ed opportunities in exotic locations, and for Randal’s incredible photography skills.

As a Physical Therapist, I’ve worked with – and treated – a lot of patients. I’ve had experiences with satisfied patients who have called me a miracle worker. On the flip side, I’ve also had patients who disagreed with my treatment altogether. And then there are those who were simply indifferent. If I’m completely honest with myself, I can reflect on – and learn from – each experience, regardless of the outcome, to improve patient care moving forward.

Over the years, I’ve taken notes on how to better my interactions with patients to get the best possible results.  I’ve also noticed that, although each patient is unique, those who have successful outcomes share a common set of attitudes and disciplines.

I’d like to share with you these best-patient-practices, which I hope can serve as a guide to help you get the most out of your time in physical therapy.

When Driving Becomes a Pain in the Butt

4 Tips For Comfortable Car Rides

Buttock Pain from Driving

So, you’re taking a summer vacation this year – driving to the cabin with the family? The river? The lake? Six hours in the car isn’t so bad. You’ll leave early to miss the traffic and make sure to use the restroom beforehand so you won’t have to stop. You’ve made the drive dozens of times before, no problem. Then you feel it – halfway there you start squirming in your seat, shifting from one cheek to the other. An hour goes by and you’ve adjusted the backrest four times with no relief. Finally, you admit it: this drive is becoming a pain in the butt!

We’ve all been there. You got a new car, you tried pillows, adjusted the seat, yet nothing seems to make a difference. So, what causes this buttock pain during long car rides and what can you do about it?