Thoracic Spine Mobility and How It Affects You

Bonus Video Exercises

Woman Stretching Thoracic Spine

You want to be flexible – so you stretch your muscles. But what about your joints? You also need to have good mobility in your joints to allow you to move freely and do the things you love. So then, what areas should you be focusing on to improve joint mobility? It turns out that you lose the most mobility in your mid and upper back – the thoracic spine – throughout your life. This decrease in mobility not only affects your back, but your neck and shoulders, as well.

Here’s how improving mobility in your thoracic spine can maximize function and even increase your strength potential. Plus, I’ll show you a few simple exercises you can do from home…

When Driving Becomes a Pain in the Butt

4 Tips For Comfortable Car Rides

Buttock Pain from Driving

So, you’re taking a summer vacation this year – driving to the cabin with the family? The river? The lake? Six hours in the car isn’t so bad. You’ll leave early to miss the traffic and make sure to use the restroom beforehand so you won’t have to stop. You’ve made the drive dozens of times before, no problem. Then you feel it – halfway there you start squirming in your seat, shifting from one cheek to the other. An hour goes by and you’ve adjusted the backrest four times with no relief. Finally, you admit it: this drive is becoming a pain in the butt!

We’ve all been there. You got a new car, you tried pillows, adjusted the seat, yet nothing seems to make a difference. So, what causes this buttock pain during long car rides and what can you do about it?

Why Lumbar Spinal Surgery Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up To Be

Lumbar Spinal Surgery

Pain grips its claws into either side of your spine, relentless to never let go. Wringing your vertebrae like a soaked towel – its drippings electricity searching for ground. Persisting for months on end, the meds become like vitamins – inherently meant for good, but their immediate effects unfulfilling. The dilemma: take the conservative route or opt for surgery? Desperate for relief, you weigh your options.

Surgery of the Lumbar Spine is a controversial topic. Despite the controversy, however, these surgeries are being performed more and more often in recent years. It’s likely you know at least one person who’s had one. You might also know someone who’s chosen conservative treatment instead. So, which is better?

Lets explore…

The 5 Weakest Areas of Your Body and How To Strengthen Them

Strengthen Weak Muscles

Weakness is a relative term. We tend to think of weakness in comparison to other people. For instance, I am weaker than ‘The Rock’ (first person who came to my mind). But what about weakness of certain muscles in your own body relative to others? There are several important groups of muscles that tend to be weak in many people.

Maybe you’ve been neglecting to strengthen some of the weakest areas of your body without even knowing it…

Why You Should Not Get An MRI For Low Back Pain

Get Physical Therapy First

Stop Before getting an MRI for Low Back Pain

Chances are, you’ve had low back pain before. You know how debilitating it can be. When it strikes, one of the first thoughts that go through your head is “is this normal?” The severity of the pain tells you it can’t be normal to feel this way. Thoughts begin to spin through your head – “What did I do to myself? Did I tear something? Do I have a bulging disc? Do I need to get an MRI to find out what’s wrong with me?”

My answer: NO.

Let me explain…

How To Prevent Low Back Pain

3 Physical Therapy Tips

Man Overcomes Low Back Pain

Have you had low back pain before? The most common source of pain in patients I see each day for Physical Therapy is low back pain. Low back pain, more than any other type of pain spans a large age range, as well. I get teenagers, new moms, middle-aged men and women, and elderly folks all complaining of the same thing. My job as a Physical Therapist is to help people like YOU prevent this pain.

Before a patient comes to see me, they have to go through a referral process from their doctor and schedule an appointment. This process usually takes anywhere from 2-3 weeks. It’s not a perfect system, but it is what it is. Therefore, it isn’t uncommon for someone to show up for their appointment only to tell me that their low back pain is already gone. Oftentimes, low back pain will go away on its own with time. The problem is that it can frequently recur. So the question isn’t how can we make your pain go away, but how can we stop it from coming back?

Regardless of whether a patient has current pain or not, I hardly ever spend the appointment treating the pain itself – this is just a symptom. No, more important is dealing with the cause of the pain.

When people come to see me for low back pain, we don’t work on how to make the pain go away, we work on how to prevent the pain from coming back in the future.

The same is true for you. You can do things today that will help prevent low back pain tomorrow.