7 Tips For Scar Management

DIY Advice From a Physical Therapist

Scar Management

For some, a scar might be a symbol of pride – a battle wound, so to speak. For others, though, scars don’t rank high on their favorite physical features list. Most of us want to minimize the appearance of scars and the physical consequences that can accompany them – itching, stiffness, tenderness, and pain1,2.

Although scars can occur from wounds and burns, for our purposes here, let’s focus on how best to manage post-surgical scars.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Physical Therapy Advice For Heel Pain

Girl with plantar fasciitis heel pain

That first step – the burning, stinging pain in your heel stops you in your tracks. It’s been getting worse over the course of the last few months and you hoped it would go away by now. All you want is to be able to live your life the way you used to – to walk and to run pain-free. Plantar Fasciitis can be debilitating and long-lasting, but with the proper treatment, you can improve.

Let’s look more closely at Plantar Fasciitis: what it is, who it affects, and what the best treatment options are…

Knee Replacement Rehab [What You Need To Know]

Total Knee Replacement Surgery

Several years ago, when I was a Physical Therapy student, I had the privilege of observing a couple of live surgeries, one of which was a Total Knee Replacement. Simply put, I was blown away at how mechanical the surgeon and his team were during the procedure. The process was precise down to the last detail – the preparation, the cuts, the tools, the measurements – nothing was left to chance. There was no guesswork, just a series of steps that were taken to get the job done.

I’m glad I got to see this surgery in particular because my current workload consists of seeing many patients recovering from Knee Replacements. Over the years I’ve learned a great deal about the rehabilitative process and what it takes to be successful.

Although outcomes are good and success is likely, no one wants surgery – it’s a last resort.

That said, if you struggle with knee pain, there’s good news. There are steps you can take to improve your mobility, strength, and function to delay and, sometimes, bypass surgery altogether.

Let’s take a look at what the knee replacement surgery looks like, who needs one, the outcomes, what the rehabilitation process looks like, and – most importantly – the steps you can take to, hopefully, never have to get one…

Why Lumbar Spinal Surgery Isn’t All It’s Cracked Up To Be

Lumbar Spinal Surgery

Pain grips its claws into either side of your spine, relentless to never let go. Wringing your vertebrae like a soaked towel – its drippings electricity searching for ground. Persisting for months on end, the meds become like vitamins – inherently meant for good, but their immediate effects unfulfilling. The dilemma: take the conservative route or opt for surgery? Desperate for relief, you weigh your options.

Surgery of the Lumbar Spine is a controversial topic. Despite the controversy, however, these surgeries are being performed more and more often in recent years. It’s likely you know at least one person who’s had one. You might also know someone who’s chosen conservative treatment instead. So, which is better?

Lets explore…

Why Meniscus Surgery Isn’t All It’s Cut Out To Be

Meniscus Surgery Operating Table

A Meniscus tear in your knee sounds pretty bad, doesn’t it? If you had a tear, your first thought, other than “Ouch!”, might be “I probably need surgery!” Well, you wouldn’t be alone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is the most common orthopedic procedure performed in the United States – about 700,000 surgeries per year costing roughly 4 billion dollars1. Being so common, you would think the meniscus surgery must have incredibly successful outcomes, right?

Not so much…

Why You Should Not Get An MRI For Low Back Pain

Get Physical Therapy First

Stop Before getting an MRI for Low Back Pain

Chances are, you’ve had low back pain before. You know how debilitating it can be. When it strikes, one of the first thoughts that go through your head is “is this normal?” The severity of the pain tells you it can’t be normal to feel this way. Thoughts begin to spin through your head – “What did I do to myself? Did I tear something? Do I have a bulging disc? Do I need to get an MRI to find out what’s wrong with me?”

My answer: NO.

Let me explain…