Jumper’s Knee – What It Takes To Get Back in the Game

Progressive Loading For Patellar Tendinosis

Jump around…jump around…jump around…jump up, jump up, and get down…” If House of Pain’s lyrics to “Jump Around” describes the sequence you went through with your knee – lots of jumping followed by some aggravated down time – it’s likely you have Jumper’s Knee – or Patellar Tendinosis. But don’t get too discouraged, later in the song they sing “…so get out your seat and jump around!” With some guidance and some hard work, you too can get back to where you want to be.

Let’s take a look at what Jumper’s Knee looks like, what you can expect in terms of outcomes, and which exercises you should be doing to improve…

ACL Surgery – Getting Back To Your Sport

With Advanced Exercise Videos

ACL injury

Two-hundred-fifty-thousand – that’s the number of ACL injuries that occur every year in the United States. Most of these injuries happen in young athletes in sports that involve jumping, pivoting, or hard cutting. One-hundred-thousand is the number of ACL reconstruction surgeries in the US each year1. Just about every athlete wants to know one thing after their ACL surgery…

“When can I get back to my sport?”

To answer this, we’ll look at:
– How much time you should spend in Physical Therapy rehabilitating
– How many months after surgery are proven to give the best outcomes
– Physical requirements for returning to sports

Knee Replacement Rehab [What You Need To Know]

Total Knee Replacement Surgery

Several years ago, when I was a Physical Therapy student, I had the privilege of observing a couple of live surgeries, one of which was a Total Knee Replacement. Simply put, I was blown away at how mechanical the surgeon and his team were during the procedure. The process was precise down to the last detail – the preparation, the cuts, the tools, the measurements – nothing was left to chance. There was no guesswork, just a series of steps that were taken to get the job done.

I’m glad I got to see this surgery in particular because my current workload consists of seeing many patients recovering from Knee Replacements. Over the years I’ve learned a great deal about the rehabilitative process and what it takes to be successful.

Although outcomes are good and success is likely, no one wants surgery – it’s a last resort.

That said, if you struggle with knee pain, there’s good news. There are steps you can take to improve your mobility, strength, and function to delay and, sometimes, bypass surgery altogether.

Let’s take a look at what the knee replacement surgery looks like, who needs one, the outcomes, what the rehabilitation process looks like, and – most importantly – the steps you can take to, hopefully, never have to get one…

Why Meniscus Surgery Isn’t All It’s Cut Out To Be

Meniscus Surgery Operating Table

A Meniscus tear in your knee sounds pretty bad, doesn’t it? If you had a tear, your first thought, other than “Ouch!”, might be “I probably need surgery!” Well, you wouldn’t be alone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is the most common orthopedic procedure performed in the United States – about 700,000 surgeries per year costing roughly 4 billion dollars1. Being so common, you would think the meniscus surgery must have incredibly successful outcomes, right?

Not so much…